Dean Forbes
 

ASIA AND THE GLOBAL KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY



The Global University City Index prepared by researchers at RMIT.


Measurement based on four elements

•    Global university recognition

•    Research inputs and performance

•    Amenity.  The livability of the city

•    Education inputs and performance


1 London, 2 Boston, 3 Paris, 4 Tokyo, 5 Melbourne.  Sydney is 6th.  Singapore 17th.



THE GLOBAL KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY (GKE)


“an economy in which the production, distribution, and use of knowledge is the main driver of growth, wealth creation and employment across all industries”


A knowledge economy has four key dimensions:

•    an emphasis on innovation and technological change;

•    an efficient infrastructure, especially in information and communications technology;

•    a business environment which stresses innovation and enterprise;

•    a strong commitment to education and human resources development. 


Two key elements

•    attracting students into higher education;

•    attracting and retaining knowledge workers.



SINGAPORE AS AN EMERGING GLOBAL SCHOOLHOUSE


The five Cs: credit card, car, condominium, cash, country club membership


Singapore and the Services Economy


The Economic Development Board’s strategy


Singapore as an Education Centre


“To promote Singapore as the Asia-Pacific hub for world class university education and training” (Ministry of Information and the Arts 1997)


The World Class University Program


Attract 10 world class universities to Singapore within 10 years, and become a global education hub.


Accelerate the building of an education brand for Singapore by associating it with universities regarded as among the world’s best.


Strengthening Singapore’s Public Universities


The National University of Singapore (NUS)

Nanyang Technological University (NTU)

Singapore Management University (SMU). 


Private Universities and Other Initiatives


UNSW Asia


Singapore as World City and Education Hub


Singapore is ranked by Taylor (2004) close behind the pre-eminent world cities of London and New York, in a group of five, which includes Frankfurt, Hong Kong, Paris and Tokyo.


Prof Arnaud De Meyer, who chaired the Education Workgroup of the ERC, envisages Singapore as a “global schoolhouse that offers a comprehensive continuum of learning experiences”.



NEW URBAN KNOWLEDGE ECONOMIES AND CREATIVE CITIES


Talent, technology and tolerance



REFERENCES


Buderi, Robert and Gregory T. Huang 2006 Guanxi: Microsoft, China and Bill Gates’ Plan to Win the Road Ahead, Random House, London.


Florida, Richard 2005 The Flight of the Creative Class: The New Global Competition for Talent, HarperCollins, New York.


Florida, Richard 2002 The Rise of the Creative Class and How It’s Transforming Work, Leisure, Community and Everyday Life, Basic Books, New York.


Forbes, Dean and Cecile Cutler 2006 “The global knowledge economy, the university, and the Southeast Asian city” in Wong Tai-Chee, Brian J. Shaw and Goh Kim Chuan (eds) Challenging Sustainability: Urban Development and Change in Southeast Asia, Marshall Cavendish Academic, Singapore, pp 175-196.


Greenfeld, Karl Taro 2002 Standard Deviations: Growing Up and Coming Down in the New Asia, Villard Books, New York.